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08

Feb

Here’s a sample of how I “script” pages when I’m both writing and drawing.  I mentioned it on my and Brandon’s latest podcast.
At first I leave the two columns on the left blank.  I fill in either dialogue or action based on whichever is the focus for a panel, and flesh it out as I go along.  Then I figure out where every first panel of a page should be, put a number “1” in the “panel” column, and number the subsequent panels to make sure there aren’t too many per page.  Finally, I number the pages to see what I’ve got, and adjust if I need to.
I like this format because A) It’s really easy to edit by deleting or adding rows, and B) I think it’s more visual.  It feels like the dialogue and action are happening simultaneously, whereas when you look at a full script, it always feels like the action happens before the dialogue in a panel.  And usually it’s the opposite when you’re reading the final page.  
Also, the spreadsheet helps you visualize how dense your panels will be, so you can police your panel counts per page, and not get too repetitive.
EDIT: The final versions of these pages can be seen here.

Here’s a sample of how I “script” pages when I’m both writing and drawing.  I mentioned it on my and Brandon’s latest podcast.

At first I leave the two columns on the left blank.  I fill in either dialogue or action based on whichever is the focus for a panel, and flesh it out as I go along.  Then I figure out where every first panel of a page should be, put a number “1” in the “panel” column, and number the subsequent panels to make sure there aren’t too many per page.  Finally, I number the pages to see what I’ve got, and adjust if I need to.

I like this format because A) It’s really easy to edit by deleting or adding rows, and B) I think it’s more visual.  It feels like the dialogue and action are happening simultaneously, whereas when you look at a full script, it always feels like the action happens before the dialogue in a panel.  And usually it’s the opposite when you’re reading the final page.  

Also, the spreadsheet helps you visualize how dense your panels will be, so you can police your panel counts per page, and not get too repetitive.

EDIT: The final versions of these pages can be seen here.

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    I thought this was particularly neat, since I’ve seen comic scripts come in a lot of different forms, but never like...
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