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10

Mar

Perspective in Storytelling 22

It took me a while to find a panel with a nice wide angle!    This one’s SUPER wide…so wide that technically there are no vanishing points.  Well, no…it looks like I made the vertical lines converge a little bit.  Honestly, I’m not sure WHAT I did because I never put a digital grid on this one!  I must’ve figured it was easier just to figure it out by hand, than to enlarge my 2-point perspective grid forever.

Wide angle!  It places the reader far away from the action, and into a more spectator role.  So you want to use it for times when you’d like some degree of separation.  Maybe you’re leaving a scene, or starting a new scene.  Maybe you want your characters to feel insignificant, one of many in a crowd, going through the motions.  Maybe your character’s having an out-of-body experience.

In this case, Madame Xanadu and J’onn J’onzz are spying on these gangsters from up above, so we are seeing everything from their perspective.  This scene starts from the gangsters’ point of view, until this panel transitions us up to where Xanadu and her new friend are perched.  They have intentionally created that degree of separation.

Of course, newer artists make the mistake of doing wide angle when they don’t mean to.  Meaning, they’ll be drawing a scene in a smallish room and the angle is so wide that a wall or ceiling would have to be knocked out.  It sort of kills the sense of space you’re creating for the reader.  This is especially true for more aerial angles indoors…if you make them too wide, you’re past the roof.  That can work with certain story beats—just make sure it’s intentional!

Next time we will be talking about 3-point perspective!!  I don’t have too many of these posts left!

For more perspective posts, click here.

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