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27

Jun

I’ve posted plenty about when to use certain perspectives for storytelling purposes over here, if you haven’t read it.  Not so much on the how-to, because you can read books on that.  The book I learned from back in the day was "Perspective Without Pain" by Phil Metzger.
But I was drawing the above and thought of some nuggets of wisdom on the how-to’s that you might not necessarily learn from a book.
First-off, this image was drawn in a fancified 1-point perspective.  I fancied it up by making the horizontal lines just slightly skewed as they move from the horizon.  So I guess it’s technically 2-point.  I bring it up because it was a very subtle adjustment that I think goes a long way.  It keeps it looking boxy like how I wanted it, while still making it feel real, and also just cool looking.
Second, is what I had mentioned before about receding objects in 1-point perspective.  A common mistake people make is they don’t let things foreshorten enough.  Try to err on the side of too much…because you almost can’t do too much!  
Check out the closest fire escape on the right.  There is actually a geometrical way to determine the exact rate of foreshortening per rail (I’m talking about the rails getting gradually thinner as they recede) but it’s a huge pain and not worth it, except maybe as learning exercise.  My guess is my rails actually recede too much.  But it’s so much cooler that way!  It almost has a curved effect this way.  I started with the closest rail and moved back…you do it the other way and it’ll just get too big.
Happy drawing!

I’ve posted plenty about when to use certain perspectives for storytelling purposes over here, if you haven’t read it.  Not so much on the how-to, because you can read books on that.  The book I learned from back in the day was "Perspective Without Pain" by Phil Metzger.

But I was drawing the above and thought of some nuggets of wisdom on the how-to’s that you might not necessarily learn from a book.

First-off, this image was drawn in a fancified 1-point perspective.  I fancied it up by making the horizontal lines just slightly skewed as they move from the horizon.  So I guess it’s technically 2-point.  I bring it up because it was a very subtle adjustment that I think goes a long way.  It keeps it looking boxy like how I wanted it, while still making it feel real, and also just cool looking.

Second, is what I had mentioned before about receding objects in 1-point perspective.  A common mistake people make is they don’t let things foreshorten enough.  Try to err on the side of too much…because you almost can’t do too much!  

Check out the closest fire escape on the right.  There is actually a geometrical way to determine the exact rate of foreshortening per rail (I’m talking about the rails getting gradually thinner as they recede) but it’s a huge pain and not worth it, except maybe as learning exercise.  My guess is my rails actually recede too much.  But it’s so much cooler that way!  It almost has a curved effect this way.  I started with the closest rail and moved back…you do it the other way and it’ll just get too big.

Happy drawing!

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